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The October, 1919 funeral cortege for The Reverend Daniel MacLean, father of MacLean Funeral Home founder, N. D. MacLean. (Photo courtesy of Prince Edward Island Public Archives and Records Office) How many times have we heard the phrase, “It’s the Island way”? There are any number of habits, phrases, or actions that can be deemed “the Island way”. In recent weeks, CBC PEI published an article about the PEI Highway Traffic Act and the legislation
This past weekend millions around the globe tuned in to watch Prince Harry marry Meaghan Markle. The observant watcher would have noticed something different – an empty seat, to the right of Prince William. Prince Harry and his bride ensured that Lady Diana was not absent from the ceremony. The empty seat recognized her physical absence from the event, but rest assured, she was in the hearts and minds of many. The bride and groom
Often times while serving the public, we’ll hear comments such as “You must be used to this” or “You’ve become immune to death”. No, we are not immune to death or the far-reaching impact it has on families and our Island community. Yes, funeral service professionals are trained to care for the deceased, taking measures to ensure dignity and respect during the transfer from the place of the death, to our care. We are trained
This past week, Canadians have been reeling from the news of the tragedy in Saskatchewan. To date, 16 people have died as the result of the horrific accident. Social media has been used to share the stories of the lives lived; the images of survivors clasping hands, banded together through a shared experience; and countless Canadian homes and businesses, with hockey sticks on the front porch. These symbols and images are part of the grieving
Most Canadians prefer to die at home, yet almost 70% of deaths occur in a hospital. Most older adults die either in hospital or a long-term care facility. When we are called to receive the deceased into our care, we respond with care and compassion. Funeral directors have been trained to demonstrate dignity and respect for the deceased. For a number of years, we were asked to receive the individual through a back door, hidden